Author Topic: Fuel Tank Negative Pressure  (Read 1876 times)

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#10

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Re: Fuel Tank Negative Pressure
Reply #10 on: 12 October, 2021, 03:20:28 PM
The roll over valve part 16 is below the tank and fixed to the ventilation tube
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#11

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Re: Fuel Tank Negative Pressure
Reply #11 on: 12 October, 2021, 03:43:36 PM
And another question on this topic: Why did it block? The ball / valve should have seized in the open position, surely? Was it gummed up somehow? I'd like to know since I have not looked at mine since 2009 and wonder if I should, and how?

#12

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Re: Fuel Tank Negative Pressure
Reply #12 on: 12 October, 2021, 04:09:59 PM
The innards of a Triumph roll over valve are not so simple
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#13

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Re: Fuel Tank Negative Pressure
Reply #13 on: 12 October, 2021, 04:13:55 PM
What I'm seeing is that the valve is normally closed under spring pressure until the vacuum draws it open. So, logically, if it sat dormant for a while it would seize closed. That actually makes total sense since you don't want an open passage to atmosphere. It also means it's not static and is working each time the bike runs and a vacuum occurs. I'd like to find mine and at least give it a shake to get any crud out and also make sure the full span of movement is available. Maybe blow it out gently as well.
Last Edit: 12 October, 2021, 04:16:52 PM by ZuluTiger

#14

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Re: Fuel Tank Negative Pressure
Reply #14 on: 12 October, 2021, 04:45:57 PM
FYI

#15

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Re: Fuel Tank Negative Pressure
Reply #15 on: 12 October, 2021, 05:18:27 PM
Thanks! Appreciate the location update. I'll get it out next time I have the tank off.

#16

Offline Kev51

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Re: Fuel Tank Negative Pressure
Reply #16 on: 13 October, 2021, 10:38:43 AM
Guys
The Roll Over Valve top tube is connected to the rearmost fuel tank 5mm spigot down via the rubber tube to the top/inlet of the valve, which is mounted in a vertical position and held in position by a plastic releasable circular grip, then from the bottom outlet of the valve, the rubber tube loops back up and connects onto the end of the Evaporative System Cannister.
When I removed the r/o valve, I filled it with Brake Cleaner overnight and then continually banged it on a cloth to loosen the valve inside. There was rust coming out of the valve onto the rag as well as rust remnants in the r/o valve outlet rubber tube.
I suggest in the first instance when you next have to remove the fuel tank to replace spark plugs or renew the air filter, or alternately you can just remove the three fuel tank hold down bolts and lift the back up of the tank far enough, so you can access the rubber tubes onto the tank spigots, and remove the tube off the Evaporative System cannister, and squirt Brake Cleaner into the valve, let it sit overnight, then apply compressed air to blow out the fluid from the rubber tube that goes into the top of the valve.
This instead of removing the valve, which is a bit tricky to get out and worse to put back in place.
I think if you do this once a year it will keep the valve in good order.
Hope this might help?
Kev
 

#17

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Re: Fuel Tank Negative Pressure
Reply #17 on: 13 October, 2021, 01:27:31 PM
Good info, thanks.

#18

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Re: Fuel Tank Negative Pressure
Reply #18 on: 13 October, 2021, 03:29:04 PM
*Originally Posted by Kev51 [+]
Guys
The Roll Over Valve top tube is connected to the rearmost fuel tank 5mm spigot down via the rubber tube to the top/inlet of the valve, which is mounted in a vertical position and held in position by a plastic releasable circular grip, then from the bottom outlet of the valve, the rubber tube loops back up and connects onto the end of the Evaporative System Cannister.
When I removed the r/o valve, I filled it with Brake Cleaner overnight and then continually banged it on a cloth to loosen the valve inside. There was rust coming out of the valve onto the rag as well as rust remnants in the r/o valve outlet rubber tube.
I suggest in the first instance when you next have to remove the fuel tank to replace spark plugs or renew the air filter, or alternately you can just remove the three fuel tank hold down bolts and lift the back up of the tank far enough, so you can access the rubber tubes onto the tank spigots, and remove the tube off the Evaporative System cannister, and squirt Brake Cleaner into the valve, let it sit overnight, then apply compressed air to blow out the fluid from the rubber tube that goes into the top of the valve.
This instead of removing the valve, which is a bit tricky to get out and worse to put back in place.
I think if you do this once a year it will keep the valve in good order.
Hope this might help?
Kev
FWIW Only Tigers 1050 for California were required to have EVAP canisters starting 200?9?. For Europe EVAP requirement for motorcycles started with Euro4 compliance in 2017.
Triumph centerstand/engine guards/heated grips, GIVI PLR6404 side rack/DLM36 panniers, SR6404 top rack with M9B plate, WL901/DLM30/V47N/TRK52B topcases, ST603/602 tanklock tankbags, EVOTECH radiator&oilcooler guards, Pyramid ExtendaFenda/hugger extension, Puig touring Screen & spoiler, Zumo 396 with Zumolock holder on RAM mount, Osco chainoiler, SWMotech sidestand extension, CNC shorty clutch/ brake levers, SCPROJECT SC1-R can, Micks 25mm lowering plates, KOSO Mini3 volt/temp/time & LED blinkers