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Author [ES] [MY] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: Hot Start Solution for Tiger 1050  (Read 699 times)

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Online Yellow Dog

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Re: Hot Start Solution for Tiger 1050
« Reply #10 on: 28 June, 2020, 08:25:57 AM »
Nice writeup J'man and you picked the most intriguing of topics on this site.

'YOU NOW HAVE OUR ATTENTION'

My take on Paul82's mammoth thread was that the ambient temperature issue was one factor that wasn't explored as deeply as others and I always wondered if some cooling airflow might make a difference (i.e. A cooler bike always starts).

I had an 07/08 Tiger for 9 years and never had such an issue however that was largely due to the ride types and longs rests after refuelling. The weak OEM battery provided on the earlier models also providing cover as most upgraded with as much battery power as was possible.

I have the current MY18 version of the Tiger and the starting when hot behaviour is quite different, as is my riding style. Last week in parts of the UK we saw unusually high temperatures and I did notice my very hot MY18 bike struggle to start after very short 'Pay at Pump' fuel stops. At this time, the 'Pudding fellow' beefier cables are all I need to make all well again, however I find your approach very interesting and a route that needs to be followed to its conclusion.

FWIW: I always considered the 'no start when hot' issue to be a Kawasaki problem, which shows that bike owners of differing marques don't talk enough or perhaps don't like to admit that their bike's are less than perfect. :006:

Looking forward to reading more. GREAT WORK   :152:
2018 TIGER 1050 SPORT - 40,000Km with zero tyre wear & zero engine or chain wear (c8

Offline Javaman

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Re: Hot Start Solution for Tiger 1050
« Reply #11 on: 28 June, 2020, 10:19:12 AM »
Dont hold your breath guys but I will be taking this further after the summer, when I will also have some additional reliability data to play with -  obviously I will post and perhaps make a YouTube video of the fix for the Triumph starter.
I have watched countless starter motor repair videos and messaged specialists with the above argument to gain their thoughts. I have read up about the effect of heat soak on starters (well documented in the car world) - indeed, find something on Denso starters and the chances are Ive watched it or read it!!! 😂
I have a few more points that should serve as correlates for the theory
1. Freddy mentions the Denso starter is ubiquitous on motorcycles and yet the problem seems restricted to Triumph . . .
He is correct in that Triumph are notorious for it, however, the problem isnt restricted to the Triumph brand, as indicated by some comments above and indeed my own experience with my S1000. That said, I have looked at the construction of some Denso starters where the brush plate is indeed bolted to the starter body and so the design does vary somewhat.
2. I followed this problem on the 800 Tiger forum and they went through the same agonising process of investigation before concluding there was a quality control issue with Triumph starter motors and their recommended fix is to swap out the motor for an aftermarket starter from Ricks Motorsports and apparently with universally positive results
3. We shouldnt forget that Pauls bike was actually fixed for perhaps 3-4 months after he upgraded his starter motor but then developed the fault intermittently. He had the same battery and cables etc. The random nature of the fault would suggest an intermittent poor connection, again consistent with the variable contact to earth made by the brush plate.

We may yet be wrong on this but I think not. Provisional results with my Beemer are more than encouraging.
Watch this space. . .
 

Offline Adam Bright

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Re: Hot Start Solution for Tiger 1050
« Reply #12 on: 02 July, 2020, 06:28:49 PM »
Not wanting to steal your thread, but the title grabbed.my interest after having difficulty starting my bike after filling up with petrol recently.

Different issue though in that it started but then died after a second. Only way I could get it to keep running was to hold some revs on until I pulled away.  When I reached the junction at end of road it was fine 🤷‍♂️

Offline Sidewinder

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Re: Hot Start Solution for Tiger 1050
« Reply #13 on: 02 July, 2020, 07:22:46 PM »
Adam, Check your battery voltage at idle.

Offline Adam Bright

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Re: Hot Start Solution for Tiger 1050
« Reply #14 on: 04 July, 2020, 11:16:10 AM »
*Originally Posted by Sidewinder [+]
Adam, Check your battery voltage at idle.

No problems there, reading 14.1V across battery...

Offline Dante

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Re: Hot Start Solution for Tiger 1050
« Reply #15 on: 04 July, 2020, 11:19:00 AM »
Great post javaman, reading your post make sense to me. I had this problem twice or three times a month during last Summer. Consider I live in Spain. I noticed my Tiger run hotter than my Speed Triple, the fan on almost three or four times more, and found running hotter made his problem to appear. I decided to check the cooling system, refiled the radiator instead of the expansion bottle, and more than half a litre was missing inside the radiator! After service and a ride in town, traffick lights and all, the bike controlled the temperature and I was able to stop and start the engine immediately. The start was not as good as when cold, but enough to. Also changed the radiator cap, for some of the coolant was spilled when the engine stopped after trying to fix the coolant level through the expansion bottle.

Since then, instead of being focussed in electrical possible causes, that appears to be the root as you say, I keep an eye on the cooling fan function and the coolant level on the radiator itself any time I service the bike. Works for me so far.